Sunday, January 14, 2018

The Needles & Environs.

Friday, 05th January_Thursday, 11th January, 2018; 
The Needles, Canyonlands National Park, Utah.


C1652
“Early Morning Desert Frost”
(Utah)
Oil Sketch on Pannelli Telati fine Cotton Panel
5” x 7”


(Take Note: for those of you who have signed up to be notified by email of new postings to this blog, you have been receiving not just a notification, but an actual copy of the new blog posting as the email.  As this does not show the images of the paintings in the best possible light, you should click on the title of the latest blog posting at the top of the post, and not the title of the painting itself; this will open up the actual blog itself, and you may then enjoy the paintings at their best.)


Needles

The Needles sector of Canyonlands National Park is as interesting in its own way as Arches NP, with its own collection of geological formations of fins, pillars, giant stone mushrooms and toadstools, and even the odd arch.  Whereas the Island in the Sky main interest for the average visitor lies in the views from the various overlooks, to really appreciate the Needles it takes some hiking.  I only tasted the possibilities, as my first, Friday, I didn’t get there until the afternoon (overcast), and on the Sunday, I retraced some of Friday’s steps to get sunny photos.  I did take a partial hike towards the Needles themselves, to get a feel for the trail; it is definitely an all day affair, for sometime in the future.  The Needles themselves are only seen from distant viewpoints, requiring either several mile hikes or jeep quality 4-wheel drive vehicles to get close and in amongst those formations.  I might have taken the hiking option, but the next three days, we’re foggy and overcast. 

I came away on Thursday the 11th, a pristine day, taking my time stopping for many photo ops along the way.  I probed down the Lockhart Road for a few miles, the road I had been camping on close to its beginning, crossing Indian Creek in doing so.  I scouted the road on the west side of North Cottonwood Canyon for nine miles and had lunch there.  Scenically, this area outside of the Needles sector, is quite striking and highly deserving of exploration in its own right.  The painting above (Early Morning Desert Frost), is from my campsite, and of the Needles Overlook.  My former campsite is up there on the extreme right cliff edge.

E.T.

As I said, Sunday the 7th was a first class day at the Needles, cloudless and relatively warm for a January day.  Photo-recon was the order of the day.  The stars were bright and seemingly myriad that night, so it was with surprise that I awoke to overcast and thick fog on the Monday.  Processing photos took up several hours, and then a couple hours were spent touching up two recent Oil Sketches, and blocking in the new one, above.

That evening the cloud which had lifted somewhat later in the afternoon, lowered again.  Way out on the Lockhart Road, somewhere below the Needles Overlook there appeared a dim hazy light as of distant beams of headlights still hidden from direct view, in the folds of the land.  I wasn’t sure that I had really seen it, as for awhile I could not spot anything further.  By and by, however, a brighter beam appeared seemingly closer and again disappearing, as though a car following a twisting road.  I kept expecting it to finally crest the low hill and roll down the nearby road and past my campsite, secluded by a low rocky ridge.  It never did.  Instead for forty minutes the beams appeared and disappeared, sometimes so strong that I was sure that any moment headlights would break over the ridge a mile distant, only to disappear again and moments later the beams would reappear dimly much further away.  At times 8 or 10 minutes went by with no beams at all.  Then a final bright finale when I thought for sure headlights would soon be visible, and then nothing.  And that was it … nothing further occurred by the time I turned in an hour later.  The Lockhart Road is gravel and extends off through the wild for miles, and is twisty as it negotiates the canyons of Indian Creek, but not convoluted enough to explain the strange light show I had observed.  What was that guy doing out there … or was it E.T.?  I’ll never know.  The next morning I was up and out of the truck when still dark, when a vehicle, headlights and all came down the road from the direction of the previous night’s mystery.  Was that the source of last night’s light … or was it E.T.???  I’ll never know.

On Thursday the 11th, after posting my last 2 Blog Postings from the Monticello, Utah Library, I found a campsite in the National Forest up Devil’s Canyon, amongst the Ponderosas … I have not seen Ponderosa Pines since coming south out of Dinosaur National Monument, when I camped up on the Uncompahgre Plateau above Unaweep Canyon, back in mid-October.

The Pigments used in the painting:

Imprimatura: W&N Venetian Red;

Drawing: W&N Ultramarine Deep, Venetian Red & Rublev Purple Ochre;

Pigments: W&N Cerulran, Cobalt & Ultramarine Deep Blues, Cadmiums Orange, Red & Yellow Pale;

Rublev: Ercolano Red, Purple Ochre, Blue Ridge Yellow Ochre, Orange Molybdate, Ceruse, Lead White #2.

Friday, January 12, 2018

Finally … the Needles.

Friday, 5th January_Sunday, 7th January, 2018; The Needles, Canyonlands, Utah.


C1651
“Snowmelt”
(Canyonlands, Utah)
Oil Sketch on Centurian Oil Primed Panel
5” x 7”



(Take Note: for those of you who have signed up to be notified by email of new postings to this blog, you have been receiving not just a notification, but an actual copy of the new blog posting as the email.  As this does not show the images of the paintings in the best possible light, you should click on the title of the latest blog posting at the top of the post, and not the title of the painting itself; this will open up the actual blog itself, and you may then enjoy the paintings at their best.) 


Firs

After three nights in my clifftop camp I meandered on down to the Needles sector of Canyonlands National Park; meander being the word as my next campsite was less than ten miles from my previous, as the Raven flies, but was over sixty by road.  On the way down I explored a rough track near Jail Rock, following it to its end three miles deep into a canyon.  It was a sweet spot for some future campsite.  Upon nearing the end of the desperate track, in an alcove in the south wall of the canyon, several taller trees were spotted, and the a few more nearby.  I studied them through my binoculars, thinking at first they might be Ponderosa Pines, but they looked more like Lodgepoles, but I finally decided that they must be firs of some kind.  What you must understand is that the only trees I have seen hereabouts, since arriving in the Moab area, have been Pinion Pines and Junipers.  These trees must have a little microclimate going for them, and I suspect that their closest relatives lie some 15 to 20 miles south in the Abajo Mountains.

Ravens

Onwards into the Needles, to the end of the Scenic Drive.  Here starts the trail to the overlook of the confluence of the Green and Colorado Rivers.  It’s a long trek which I was not prepared to do, but a few photos were taken of the formations and canyons, before returning to my truck.  Two Ravens were still rest atop my Thule carrier, and as I approached one of them crapped on the Thule and dropped down to the roof and then down onto the cover tarp on my trailer-hitch platform … Ravens have very sharp claws, as witnessed by the two rents shredded into the tarpaulin, as that one landed there and tried to get a purchase on the wobbly surface.  These two beggars were just that, a testament to the many visitors who do not follow the Park rules to not feed the wildlife.  As I got in and started the engine, one of them even landed on my wing-mirror in a last attempt to elicit a snack, until I began to drive off.  Two days later I was on this road again, stopping at various short trails, such as that at the picnic area, then Potholes Point, and finally at the end of the road.  In each of the places I parked a pair of opportunistic Ravens would appear.  I suspected that they might be the same pair at each spot; the road was winding and although the driving distance from my first stop to the last was about 3 miles, as the Raven flies it was much shorter.  At road’s end, as they stood on the ground ear the driver’s seat looking up at me, I told them that if they were outside the Park boundaries I might flip them a snack, but inside the Park I would abide by the rules, and then off I drove.  About half a mile up the hill I stopped in a lay-by to take a photo, and as I looked back down the road I spotted them flying across country towards the Potholes Point trail.  As I drove past that trailhead, there they were, so my suspicions were correct … that pair covers that stretch of road.  There was only another car or two during my time on these short trails, so they have learned that the car leaving one trailhead will soon be showing up at the next.  Ravens … smart birds.



Thursday, January 11, 2018

South towards the Needles.

Friday, 29th December_Tuesday, 2nd January, 2018; South of Moab, Utah.

C1650
“Canyonlands Snow”
(Utah)
Oil Sketch on Centurian Oil Primed Panel
5” x 7”


(Take Note: for those of you who have signed up to be notified by email of new postings to this blog, you have been receiving not just a notification, but an actual copy of the new blog posting as the email.  As this does not show the images of the paintings in the best possible light, you should click on the title of the latest blog posting at the top of the post, and not the title of the painting itself; this will open up the actual blog itself, and you may then enjoy the paintings at their best.)

Libraries are few and far between in these parts … so much for the delay in getting this post out.

Oil change in Moab and finally heading south, but not so far, as it was late in the day.  I revisited the Dinosaur track way I had helped to excavate back in October, as I wanted a few more reference photos of the landscape.  The road in is a difficult one, so I parked at the first washed and hiked the last mile in, following a pair of two or three day old coyote tracks all the way, and arriving within seconds after the lowering Sun went in behind the late afternoon clouds.  It came out again, but the closer ridges were now in shadow; I had wanted them in the golden light of evening.  As I hiked back to the truck the Sun set and a waxing gibbons Moon hung above the La Sal Mountains to the east.  In the gloaming I found a campsite a couple miles in from the highway. 

The next day was warming and was getting up to just under 50°F, so I took advantage of that and stripped down to the waist and gave myself a much needed haircut, beard trim and shaved, where necessary, and trimmed my moustache.  The Sun on my body felt warmer than the ambient air temperature actually was.  Anyone visiting that campsite will be wondering what animal left those chunks of fur in the dust!  Winter is a difficult time to find the right temperature to do a self inflicted haircut, so I’m happy that everything aligned just right … January and February might prove difficult.
 
I had Internet access where I was so the last day of the year was spent as a lazy day clearing emails and doing online research.  And that evening the Moon rose full, over the La Sals, the Man in the Moon, directly upright, looking to the left.  An odd thing about this camp was that, save for a couple of ravens, there was no wildlife observed.  There were tracks of deer and rabbits, and even a hopping bird, in the snow, but only the ravens during the three days I was there.

New Years day was spent finishing the above Oil Sketch I had begun up on Island in the Sky, and on the 2nd I headed for the Needles, but was sidetracked to the Needles Overlook.  Three miles from there I found a great spot to camp, right on the clifftop with distant views of the Needles, Indian Creek Canyon, and Junction  Butte at Island in the Sky, and of course beyond them all the Henry Mountains to the southwest.  I expected no lights anywhere, but as evening grew darker, there was one dim light to the west, almost as dim as a 5th or 6th magnitude star.  Once the Moon arose, I could only find it with my binoculars.  The next morning by using map and binoculars, I worked out that it must have been someone at the White Crack Campground at the southern point of the a White Rim Trail, over in the Island  in the Sky section of Canyonlands NP.  Evidently that is quite a back road, being a hundred miles of dirt road for high clearance, 4-wheel drive vehicles.  I believe that a Jeep is not necessary, as one would want when going to the Maze section of Canyonlands.  I was tempted, but the icy conditions when I was on the Island in the Sky, made my decision for me; besides, I would have had to go to Moab for petrol first.  But someone was over there, during my first night in my clifftop camp.

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Snow in the Desert

Wednesday, 20th December_Thursday, 28th December, 2017; Canyonlands N.P., Utah.


The day after my last posting, revisited a couple of trails, and a new one from the Devil’s Garden Campground to Tapestry Arch to the back side of Broken Arch, through that one, and circling back through some fins to my car.  I had done the walk to Broken Arch from the front side earlier in my sojourn in the Arches National Park area.  On this last walk the day’s overcast was beginning to clear away allowing some wonderful late afternoon light to flood the landscape.  By the time I reached my SUV it was about 45 minutes to Sundown, so I prepared and ate supper in the picnic area at the Devil’s Garden.  Here I was also able to fill my water bottles, the only available water in the Park other than at the Visitor Center near the main entrance.  By the time I returned to my dispersed campsite, it was dark, and so I put on my headlamp, turned to the red light setting, and scanned the sagebrush, looking for eyes … there were.  I turned the light to bright white in time to spot the Bobcat that had strolled through my camp two days before, and who now scurried off when I said “I see you!” 

The far side of Broken Arch.

Sun breaking through as I came out of the Fins.


I had checked the Weather Underground on my way back to camp and there was a bit of snow in the forecast, amounting to about an inch.  I wondered whether we would get any as there were lots of stars poking through the cloud breaks, and the sunset had been good.  When I awoke on the morning of the 21st, and looked at my watch, I was thinking it should be a bit brighter than it seemed to be.  Snow covered all my window; four inches of it I soon discovered.  There was a bit of a break, but while I breakfasted, it began anew, and when it lightened up at about 13:00, another four inches had fallen.  I gingerly drove out of camp the 3-1/2 miles to the primitive loo at the Klondike Bluffs trailhead.  It was fairly straightforward driving through the virgin snow, only needing my 2-wheel drive through the 8” snowfall. On my return journey I stopped at the usual spot where I had Internet access, and dashed off a few emails, and checked the Weather again … the snowfall was over, and the next day was set to be sunny.

Snow in the Desert on the 21st.

My Campsite the day after the Snowfall.

Where I’ve come from …

   … where I’m going.
And it was.  I decided I had better try to get out of the snowy wilds as the wash the road passed through to get to Klondike Bluffs, from the main Park road, was said to be impassable when wet.  I debated whether to go the 10 or 12 miles north to the highway, which I had never done, or attempt the usual route through the wash and up the 3 mile long hill to the main Park road, near the Devil’s Garden.  I headed along the usual route, following my own tire tracks past Klondike Bluffs, then through the powdery virgin snow, stopping now and then to study animal tracks crossing the road.  The snow was too powdery make identification, other than those rodent tracks heading to and from their burrows, a few bird tracks, including wing impressions at the entrance to one burrow … I wonder if the denizen of the den was captured. The larger trails I suspect were of deer.
 
Then down into the wash for several hundred yards, and now for the first time, I put ‘er into 4-wheel drive as began the long incline up to the blacktop.  It was quite a slog, but I made it to the top, and found the gate closed as I had feared it might be.  On close inspection, I discovered that the padlock had not been closed; it only looked so from a little distance.  I passed through and replaced the lock as I had found it.

Snowy Fins.

Skyline Arch.

The Wall of Elephants.

Delicate Arch from the Garden of Eden,
several miles away.

I had the Park all to myself for 5 hours, taking snow photos, as they had closed it for snowplowing.  No wonder those snowplows I waved to as I passed by looked at me strangely.  I saw my first car, and then a second, and then a flurry as I neared Balanced Rock.

Balanced Rock.

Park Avenue.

The next two nights were spent on Willow Springs Road, where I had spent a few nights in early November.  The intervening day was spent going to see “The Last Jedi,” which I found very enjoyable.  The second morning I awoke at this new campsite was cold … about 8°F … but it must have been a damp cold as it felt so much colder than it was.  When I climbed up to the visitors center, in the Island in the Sky section of Canyonlands National Park, I discovered that it had been only down to 28°F that morning … 20 degrees warmer than down below!  Evidently, it often is warmer in the Winter up there than down in Moab, a couple thousand feet below, in its bowl where all the cold air flows down to and settles.  That made up my mind for me … I would stay in the National Park Campground, at Willow Flats (as opposed to Willow Springs Road), over Christmas.

View down onto the White Rim,
from the Grand View Trail, Canyonlands,
with the La Sal Mountains beyond.

Closer …

… and closer still.

Still on the …

… Grand View Trail.

 Island in the Sky is a very irregular mesa top, with an altitude averaging 6000’, with overlooks into the canyon systems of the Colorado and Green Rivers, whose confluence lies a few miles to the south.  There are a few actual glimpses of the Green.  Funny to think I was near the headwaters of the Green but four months ago when camping at Mosquito Lake in the northern Wind River Range, and it was the same Green that passes through the Gates of Lodore, and Split Mountain, both of which I saw when in Dinosaur National Monument.  The colours on the cliffs, in the sunlight, seen from these various Canyonlands viewpoints are wonderful, especially early or late in the day.

The Green River Overlook.

Closer still to see the Green River ...
the formation on the center right is the Turks Hat.


The most interesting trail for me is the one to the Upheaval Dome overlooks.  In a nutshell, there are two theories of its origin.  One says that a salt dome pushed up and cracked the rocks above, and the other is that it was formed by a meteor strike.  I plump for the latter, because of the double ring surrounding the hilly mass in the center, highly reminiscent of the craters on the Moon.  It was discussed with others at the first overlook and we decided … definitely a meteor!  Take note, you at the National Geological Office.  Next is the Needles district of Canyonlands.


Upheaval Dome from the 1st overlook …
definitely a meteor strike. 


Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Moonlight in the Garden of Eden.

Friday, 15th December_Tuesday, 19th December, 2017; Arches N.P., Utah.


 C1649
“Moonlight in the Garden of Eden”
(Arches National Park, Utah)
Oil Sketch on Centurian Oil Primed Panel
5” x 7”




(Take Note: for those of you who have signed up to be notified by email of new postings to this blog, you have been receiving not just a notification, but an actual copy of the new blog posting as the email.  As this does not show the images of the paintings in the best possible light, you should click on the title of the latest blog posting at the top of the post, and not the title of the painting itself; this will open up the actual blog itself, and you may then enjoy the paintings at their best.)



Night in the wild places, especially under the light of the Moon, is truly magical, especially when not an artificial lamp is to be seen, and so a sketch, or perhaps it is a study, is attempted.  Once your night eyes have adjusted over a hour or so (no don’t look at the Moon itself), it seems as bright as daylight.  Here the La Sal Mountains are in the distance, lurking beyond the far fins, and here in the foreground the pillars and fins of the Garden of Eden throw inky shadows across the uneven ground.  Perhaps it is called the Garden of Eden because it is a primordial landscape, and we will accept that explanation, even though it does not seem Edenic to me as I usually think of lush forest when thinking of that term.

The Drawing phase of the Painting,
with no Imprimatura.

The Block-in phase.
The last few days, without the Moon to interfere, it has been so interesting to watch the horizon, and see first the star Castor, and then its twin, Pollux, pop into view 28 minutes later, and each of them rising 4 minutes earlier every consecutive evening.  Another couple of weeks they will be rising in the twilight hours, but I will have moved on and won’t have the same horizon line to watch.  It is the “popping into view” at the expected time that I find fun … “pop” … and there it is Castor, and 28 minutes later, “pop” … Pollux!

And speaking of the wild, yesterday as I was working on this painting, a Wildcat strolled through my camp, not thirty feet away, nonchalantly, a true feline, not even looking at my vehicle.  No … I did not get a photograph.  By the time I downed the paintbox, got the camera out and quietly opened the door, all I saw of it was the top of its head or back occasionally above the sagebrush, with no full views before it disappeared a hundred yards away.  I was hoping for it to cross an open space so I could get a shot with my magic camera, but t’was not to be.  It was lynx-like, not a Bobcat, and about twice as large as the biggest house cat I have ever seen; a first for me!  My resident rabbit was munching away this morning, so she weathered the intrusion safely.  I wonder if the Wildcat had already studied my truck before strolling down through my camp?  I guess it was a Bobcat … just Googled up the info.

The Pigments used in the painting:

Imprimatura: none;

Drawing: W&N Ultramarine Deep;

Pigments: W&N Ultramarine Deep Blue;

Michael Harding: Prussian Blue;

Rublev: Ercolano Red, Purple Ochre, Blue Ridge Yellow Ochre, Ceruse, Lead White #2.

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Geminids Meteor Shower … or is it Rain?

Monday, 30th October_Thursday, 14th December, 2017; Arches N.P., Utah.


C1648
“Last Light on the La Sals”
(from Arches National Park, Utah)
Oil on Pannelli Telati Panel
3½” x 9¼”



(Take Note: for those of you who have signed up to be notified by email of new postings to this blog, you have been receiving not just a notification, but an actual copy of the new blog posting as the email.  As this does not show the images of the paintings in the best possible light, you should click on the title of the latest blog posting at the top of the post, and not the title of the painting itself; this will open up the actual blog itself, and you may then enjoy the paintings at their best.)


Views of the La Sal Mountains I see quite often upon my travels about this area, and this particular view, more than most and in different lights, as it is on my way to and from my camp.  This evening depicted here was one of the best, so I couldn’t let it pass.  At the bottom of this post you will note that the usual pigments I have been using recently are used here, with the addition of Ceruse, a soft unassuming Lead White, which mixes well without overpowering the pigments Rembrandt used Ceruse.  I find it interesting that this quiet evening used the same colours as the bright mid-day colours of the last posting.  No extra photographs posted this time as I need to get away from the library earlier today, so enjoy the painting.

So … stars and things astronomical … well, the Geminid Meteor Shower is one that I have always ignored, usually because I have been in cloudy Winter climes much of my past, but also because it’s usually just darn cold.  However this year I decided to spend a little time observing it on its peak night, which was last night, before turning in, since I have been experiencing pristine desert skies, at altitude, and I’m already dressed for the cold.  So of course the overcast rolled in just before Sundown, and even had a twenty minute shower of the wrong kind (rain!!!), AT BEDTIME, the same time I thought I would be watching a shower of METEORS!!!  I awoke at 5 AM to clear skies an while I was dressing (a long process lying in a prone position, and putting on layer after layer for cold protection, I did see nine Geminids, out my SUV window facing northeast, one very bright and long. I have seen several Geminids each of the preceding nights, but wished to compare those nights to the peak night.  Alas, t’was not to be.

It has been getting into the high 40’s Fahrenheit, for about 10 days now, with the night-time temperatures down into the teens, so I guess it’s Winter now.  I shall be moving slowly south soon, but I still have another painting I want to complete here, and then there is part of Canyonlands National Park to see before I leave the Moab area, so a few days yet … can’t believe I’ve been here as long as I have, but the landscape here is so interesting.  Also with these short Winter days, my daily painting time is so limited.  Still, as one of my Art masters used to say … press on.


The Pigments used in the painting are:

Imprimatura & Drawing: Rublev Ercolano Red;

Pigments: W&N Cerulean, Cobalt & Ultramarine Deep Blues, Cadmiums Yellow Pale & Orange;

Rublev: Ercolano Red, Purple Ochre, Orange Molybdate, Lead White #2, Ceruse.

Friday, December 8, 2017

Red Rocks and Starry Skies.

Monday, 30th October_Friday, 08th December, 2017; Arches N.P., Utah.

C1647
“Rocks Red … Foliage Green”
(Arches National Park, Utah)
Oil on Pannelli Telati Panel
5” x 7”



(Take Note: for those of you who have signed up to be notified by email of new postings to this blog, you have been receiving not just a notification, but an actual copy of the new blog posting as the email.  As this does not show the images of the paintings in the best possible light, you should click on the title of the latest blog posting at the top of the post, and not the title of the painting itself; this will open up the actual blog itself, and you may then enjoy the paintings at their best.)


It’s all over down here in southern Utah … Red Rocks … ancient sedimentary rock.  That doesn’t mean there are not other colours present in this geological landscape, there are; yellow ochres, browns, tans and even greens, but red is the predominate colour one thinks about once darkness falls and the day is considered before sleep.  This makes for a very interesting landscape of contrasting colours, with the greens of the Junipers, Pinyon Pines, Sagebrush and other bushes complementing the earth red rocks; kind of like subdued Christmas colours everywhere.


The Wall of Elephants near Double Arch.

Double Arch.

The cliffs especially glow at sundown, almost on fire, and I have observed most clear evenings, about twenty to thirty minutes after the sun has set, the cliffs radiating a different sort of glow seemingly from within while the rest of the landscape and the sky are darkened with the dusk.  This glow seems to last about ten or so minutes.


The South Window.

Evening Glow at the Wall of Elephants.
And once the darkness descends, the Stars sparkle and the Milky Way shines in the night sky as diamond dust on deep blue velvet.  When We were younger, before the night skies were filled with the smoke and dust of the Industrial Revolution and before Edison’s light bulbs pushed back the glorious dark of the Night, We all had skies like these.  One of the interesting things about camping in the same spot for a period of time as I have been recently is observing the celestial mechanics of the night sky in action.  Even though I have known these things, having always been interested in Astronomy (Astronomy … not Astrology), to watch the same stars rise at the same point on the horizon night after night, but approximately four minutes earlier every night, is a lesson about the annual revolution of the Earth around the Sun.  Four minutes each night means that after fifteen days have passed, the same star is rising one hour earlier than it was, and thus multiply that hour by 24 hours, a year will have passed and the star will be rising at the same time that it did when you began your observations.  Of course you won’t be able to keep up your observations of any particular star when it rises during the day, but watching it rise a whole hour earlier after only fifteen days, and you begin to get the picture.  So there you are, then.

Fins.

Tunnel Arch glowing with the late afternoon Sun.

In the painting (at top) the butte in the distance is known as the Tower of Babel (no I don’t know why), and the pillar of rock in the center has no name that I have discovered.  The Pigments used in the painting are the usual ones I’ve been using recently in this Red Rock Country:

Imprimatura & Drawing: Rublev Ercolano Red;

Pigments: W&N Cerulean, Cobalt & Ultramarine Deep Blues, Cadmiums Yellow Pale & Orange;

Rublev: Ercolano Red, Purple Ochre, Orange Molybdate, Lead White #1.